Home » The Psychologlist March 2013 (The Psychologist 2013) by The British Psychological Society
The Psychologlist March 2013 (The Psychologist 2013) The British Psychological Society

The Psychologlist March 2013 (The Psychologist 2013)

The British Psychological Society

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Kindle Edition
121 pages
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The Psychologist is the monthly publication of The British Psychological Society. We aim to provide a forum for discussion and debate amongst members of the Society and beyond, and ‘to promote the advancement and diffusion of a knowledge ofMoreThe Psychologist is the monthly publication of The British Psychological Society. We aim to provide a forum for discussion and debate amongst members of the Society and beyond, and ‘to promote the advancement and diffusion of a knowledge of psychology pure and applied’. The Psychologist is supported by www.thepsychologist.org.uk, where you can view this month’s issue, search the archive, listen, debate, contribute, subscribe, advertise, and more.The British Psychological Society is the representative body for psychology and psychologists in the UK. We are responsible for the development, promotion and application of psychology for the public good. For more information, see www.bps.org.uk.Have you heard of ‘brain fag’? ‘Ghost sickness’? ‘Koro’? All are so-called ‘culture bound syndromes’ listed in DSM, the latter referring to a person’s overwhelming belief that their genitals are shrinking and will disappear.Why have such syndromes remained largely ‘culture bound’, while Western concepts have crept across the globe? In 2004 the New York Times wrote that ‘the notion that [your soul] can catch cold (kokoro no kaze) was introducedto Japan by the pharmaceutical industry to explain mild depression to a country that almost never discussed it’. That article (see tinyurl.com/a4jh3ac) went onto conclude that ‘rather than expanding options for care for those who suffer, the globalization of psychopharmacology may ultimately sow a monocrop of ideas about health and sickness’. In this issue (p.182), Ross White raises a similar possibility: that globalising notions of psychiatric illness may cause more harm than good.Elsewhere there’s our usual serving of articles, interviews, news, reviews, and another excellent contribution from a ‘New voice’.Dr Jon Sutton